PP Webbing


Nylon Webbing

PP Webbing or Polypropylene webbings better known as polypro webbings on the other hand, are drastically different from the nylon ones. These have a tensile strength of 600-1000 pounds depending upon the width of the webbing. Also, polypropylene webbings can easily melt at 320 degree F. The only edge that these have against the nylon ones are that these are acid resistant. Alkalies, oil or grease do not have any adverse effect on these webbings hence, these are often used in batteries or at places where acids are directly coming in contact with the webbings. These are easily available in the standard colors of red, black, yellow, white, green and blue. Though on a flip side, if talk about the minus points of nylon webbings then, poor4 resistance to acids is one major lacking point. Since these are water absorbent and can stretch and float while being within water, they often used for marine purposes.


These are water absorbent and can stretch and float while being within water, they often used for marine purposes.


P.P. Webbing is a strong fabric woven as a flat strip or tube of varying width and fibers often used in place of rope. It is a versatile component used in Military apparel, Military Belts, Arrow Space, Rock Climbing, Rescue Operations, Movie Actions, Slack lining, Furniture Manufacturing, Automobile safety, Auto racing, Vehicle Towing, Parachuting, Pet Leash, Safety Harness, Load securing, and many other fields.


Originally made of cotton or flax, most modern webbing is made of synthetic fibers such as Nylon, Polypropylene or Polyester. Webbing is also made from exceptionally high-strength material, such as Dyneema, and Kevlar. Webbing is both light and strong, with high non breaking strengths available.


There are two basic constructions of webbing. Flat webbing is a solid weave, with seatbelts and most backpack straps being common examples. Tubular webbing consists of a flattened tube, and is commonly used in climbing and industrial applications.